Promoting Personal Training

 In Attracting Clients, Marketing

Welcome! So, you are or you want to be, a personal trainer! Great! The world needs you! We’re not getting fitter, we’re getting fatter. Every day people are talking about it on the street. On a brief walk to transition at a triathlon today a fellow athlete quoted something he’d read that states 80-90% of adults can’t even run a mile. Even more problematic? Almost as high a percentage of our children can’t. We need change to improve our future.

Fitness professionals love training. They don’t, in general, love selling.

In order to help those that need you most, you will have to learn to sell. The demand for personal training is growing, it’s true. Beyond that however, the need for it among those who aren’t currently and aren’t in the future going to demand it is tremendous. If you want a bottomless market, this is it.

They won’t come in the door, you’ll have to go get them. You have to walk and talk and think as they do. You have to consider whether your appearance and uniform and personality may intimidate them. Then at least you’ll have the beginnings of a plan to help yourself be more successful at a career that you were likely drawn to out of passion.

Imagine: you’re overweight – by 25-100lbs. You’ve never enjoyed exercise. You’ve been last picked, or last in the race since you can remember. You’re uncomfortable sweating, breathing hard, embarrassed by your appearance.

Now look in the mirror dressed in your personal training ‘uniform.’ Are you the person that this prospective client will identify with and share insecurities with? Or are you intimidatingly fit and well-defined and wearing body-conscious clothing that is borderline suggestive?

If you wish to break into the largest market and slice of the pie there is to be had in America, you need to be likable, approachable, and welcoming to the deconditioned market. People want to buy from someone they like, and they’ll open up to you if you can create rapport. We all make near instantaneous decisions about a person when we meet them. Be conscious of whether your appearance is a bridge or a dam to your potential clients.

It’s not the only thing to consider but it’s your first step!

Help people (and yourself at the same time)with the hyphen. The dash between the date of birth and date of death on your tombstone is all important.

ACTION STEPS: Assess your appearance at work. What’s working? What needs improving?

Comments
  • TJ

    diet is important also , work out at least 30 minutes a day.

    Great Post