5 Pieces of Fitness Blog Content You Need

 In Marketing, Uncategorized

Coming up with fitness blog content may feel overwhelming. It may feel like pressure for reasons you haven’t even put your finger on. There’s that little voice that says, what are other trainers going to think… what will my boss think… will I offend any of my clients… and much of that stems from doubts about..do I really know what I’m talking about? Why would anyone listen to me? I’m not sure about this, even though I’m quoting a study, there are other studies saying something different….

You could be up in your head for so long you never write anything! Here’s what you do know. You have customers now. You have people at least asking your advice. You’re excited about information that can change lives and improve the quality of life form them. No matter where you are, start from there. Whether you write about your own experience (bam! you happen to be the expert on that) or you interview an expert (you suddenly become an authority because you ask the right questions for your audience: you don’t have to know them all) you need to do it regularly.

A blog has to be a regular source of consistent information that adds value. Otherwise, the reasons to do it- regularly, and consistently offering support for prospects that brings them to your site – fail to do what a blog should do. So, let s answer the question about content. You can decide whether it’s a round up from a single expert, many experts, a story about you, or written or video or both. You first need to have some basics and these will keep you going for a long time if you rotate them regularly. Consider doing recipes on Friday (biggest grocery shopping day) for instance, or how-to exercises that lead to why you have a program on Monday (biggest workout day).

What should your fitness blog content be about?

  • Recipes – if you give them recipes it’s more than just another recipe. For them, you’re fitness blog contentbonding and making life easier. Just be sure you’ve made it, you can make it personal with your own comments. For you, it’s training them to open your emails because you’re going to give them something valuable. It’s a breath of fresh air if you’re not spamming them with promotion, promotion, promotion.
  • Fat loss/Weight Loss – give them real science not calories in, calories out BS from 1980s. They are hearing too much science that if you don’t talk about it, it’s like ignoring the elephant in the room. Fat women, fat men, and even skinny girls want fat loss. Use fat loss in the title and they’ll open.
  • A personal story – share yours or a trainer on your staff. Why do you use a sauna for detox? What did xxx do during her fitness blog content saunapregnancy for exercise? What is her post-baby training like? What complications, concerns, or challenges did she have? That’s someone your members or clients watched for months, so they feel connected. They’ll read it. Share a picture of the baby and you’ve got them.
  • Client success stories – similar to above, you have to talk about the struggle first. Why is it such a success if you haven’t told the rags story? It’s not. Tell the hard stuff to get emotion.
  • WHY you have a program, how it helps, how you developed it, and what it’s doing for the people you’ve already tested it on – all those questions should be answered in a series of emails before you announce a new program. Then you have an audience that is ripe and ready. You’ve actually planned and seeded interest so when you announce registration is open they are so ready!

Fitness blog content can come from any one of those and I’ll bet if you are a writer, or educator, that you’ve got several ideas in each category already. Jot those down. Include who you might interview, quote, talk about (even if you don’t disclose a name or identify of a client), and you’ll have a long list of juicy go-to content.

Add to each post idea, potential statistics to look up and primary research links to include that add credibility. Don’t forget the call to action for each. It has to make sense with the reason the reader got attracted to the post. A generic, give us a call, or schedule a consult is not relevant and may be too big a leap for someone who has just found you.