How to End the Discount Mentality That Harms Your Fitness Business

 In professional development, Selling a Prospect

IS IT  YOU? OR YOUR CUSTOMER WHO HAS IT WORST?

Watch this brief video for the solution to your customer’s issue. If you have the discount mentality, it will be harder to change.

 

Package your services in a way that goes far beyond the 30, 45 or 60 minutes of face time they get with you.

What problems do your clients have between sessions that you could solve by creating something once that will serve all your customers?

What do you wish they would do that they don’t? What do they do that they wish they hadn’t? Find a solution to those problems and spend the time once to create a quality product or service for it. Tie this (or multiple things) to your “premium” package. This is what you talk about when you sell.

This is your most life-changing lifestyle package. It’s all the things you know someone needs to be successful.

Customers who want to know when you have a next “sale” or who ask if you have a senior or student discount – you respond in this way:

“Let’s talk about what you’re looking for, why now is the perfect time, and what value we might cut out to make this more affordable for you.”

Most customers don’t want to lose value. They want to get all of you, and all of the service. Whatever is now your “bottom” price now though needs to be a fine rate for you- that includes a profit margin. Premium is a way to raise your rates and give more generously to all future clients. Give current clients adequate warning about rate increases. Two months is adequate if they pay monthly.

Don’t have a “sale” before you implement new rates or you’ve just defeated yourself and discount mentality has won again. You train your customer that they will always get a “deal” because you feel guilty about raising rates.

Not all of the “deal-seekers” are your ideal clients.

Those who have to think about it, don’t get to take advantage of the irritable offer that is available right now. If you don’t stick to your policy, you don’t earn the integrity that you want to claim.

Sometimes in business it’s not your job to be “nice” if it means selling yourself out.

~Debra